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Chapters from Children and Adolescents
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Chapter 1: Children's Emerging Awareness of Death
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Chapter 1: Children's Emerging Awareness of Death
In the opening chapter, Charles Corr examines how children develop an awareness of death. He warns against relying too heavily on stage-based schemas because of their tendency towards oversimplification. He discusses the two central components of death awareness—finality and universality and concludes by giving 17 guidelines to use when interacting with children about death and dying.


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Chapter 2: The Adolescent’s Encounter with Death
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Chapter 2: The Adolescent’s Encounter with Death
David Balk addresses four main questions: (1) How do adolescents understand death? (2) What kind of experiences with death do adolescents have? (3) How do these experiences vary across different cultures? (4) What should counselors know to better work with this population?


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Chapter 3: Completing the Picture: Adult Perspectives on Death—Implications for Children and Adolescents
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Chapter 3: Completing the Picture: Adult Perspectives on Death—Implications for Children and Adolescents
Humans struggle to understand death not just in childhood and adolescence, but throughout the life cycle. Kenneth Doka traces our conceptualization from conceptualization in childhood, personalization in middle adulthood, and reconciliation in later adulthood. How adults envision and react to death and dying also affects children.

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Chapter 4: Children’s Hospice Care
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Chapter 4: Children’s Hospice Care
Charles Corr gives a brief history of pediatric hospice care and explains why its development has been slow and uneven. Doctors often cling to cure-oriented treatment long after chance for cure has passed. Families are understandably reluctant to acknowledge that sometimes, the best treatment is palliative in nature. Corr recommends changing policies to allow children with terminal illness and their families to benefit from hospice care when the child is not expected to live to adulthood, instead of the present policy—when the child is expected to live six or fewer months.


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Chapter 5: Management of End-of-Life Pain and Suffering in Children and Adolescents
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Chapter 5: Management of End-of-Life Pain and Suffering in Children and Adolescents
Rebecca Selove, Dianne Cochran, Ira Todd Cohen, argue for a “multimodal approach” to alleviate pediatric end-of-life pain. By integrating pharmacological and psychosocial care, practitioners can better serve the needs of neonates, infants, toddlers, children, adolescents, and their families. The value of effective pediatric pain management extends beyond the life of the child, as witnessing a painful death is oftentimes a complicating factor for surviving family members.


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Chapter 6: Dying at an Early Age: Ethical Issues in Pediatric Palliative Care
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Chapter 6: Dying at an Early Age: Ethical Issues in Pediatric Palliative Care
By explaining the “social ecology model” of pediatric end-of-life care and contrasting it to the “medical treatment model” and the “medical services model,” Bruce Jennings makes a strong case for an end-of-life ethic that acknowledges the reality of death and offers humane, holistic, and team-centered care.

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Chapter 7: Grieving Children and Adolescents: Lessons from the Harvard Child Bereavement Study
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Chapter 7: Grieving Children and Adolescents: Lessons from the Harvard Child Bereavement Study
The Harvard Child Bereavement Study, a longitudinal investigation of the impact of parental death, concluded with eight finding listed in this chapter. J. William Worden, one of the original researchers, explains the findings. Also included are clinical implications.


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Chapter 8: When a Parent Dies: Helping Grieving Children and Adolescents
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Chapter 8: When a Parent Dies: Helping Grieving Children and Adolescents
Parental death is one of the most traumatic events that can occur in childhood. Rachel Haine, Tim Ayers, Irwin Sandler, and Sharlene Wolchik ask the following questions: What demographic factors should I consider when working with parentally bereaved children? What is the role of the cause of death? How can I support healthy grief reactions following the death of a parent? How can I help a child build effective coping skills? And, how can I work with the surviving parent to improve child adaptation following the death?


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Chapter 9: Sibling Loss: Issues for Children and Adolescents
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Chapter 9: Sibling Loss: Issues for Children and Adolescents
Siblinghood is oftentimes the longest lasting relationship throughout one’s life. As the sibling relationship is so unique, Nancy Hogan outlines how sibling loss differs from other loss and suggests methods to help children maintain a continuing bond with their deceased siblings.


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Chapter 10: When a Friend Dies
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Chapter 10: When a Friend Dies
The loss of a friend in childhood is often disenfranchised, or unrecognized by others. Ilene and Lloyd Noppe remind us of the significance of childhood friendship They then show the importance of understanding the developmental level of friend-grievers, the nature of the friendship, and how the death occurred in order to effectively counsel those who have lost a friend.

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Chapter 11: Military Children and Grief
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Chapter 11: Military Children and Grief
Betsy Beard, Judith Mathewson, Heather Campagna, and Tina Saari begin this chapter by explaining the mitigating factors that make military loss unique—extended absence before the death, the military’s method of death notification, military funerals and the accompanying media attention, as well as the oftentimes troubling method of returning the body to the family. They outline specific interventions appropriate in these circumstances, including grief camps, peer support groups, military mentors, and rituals to honor their sacrifice.


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Chapter 12: Grief Therapy with Children and Adolescents: An Overview
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Chapter 12: Grief Therapy with Children and Adolescents: An Overview
David Crenshaw shows how to determine which children need professional intervention. After listing several “red flags,” he continues by contrasting bereavement support to grief therapy. Careful distinction between the two is needed, as children who are simply struggling to adapt to loss are different from children who exhibit serious adjustment problems that require more robust intervention.


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Chapter 13: Camps for Grieving Children: Lessons from the Field
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Chapter 13: Camps for Grieving Children: Lessons from the Field
Sherry Schachter and Maria Georgopoulos describe their efforts at a children’s grief camp in New York. They give a review of camp programs and then explain why such programs are needed to deal with the range of emotions experienced by grieving children.


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Chapter 14: Grief Groups for Grieving Children and Adolescents
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Chapter 14: Grief Groups for Grieving Children and Adolescents
Donna Shuurman first asks how support groups can help grieving children. She then lists ten important considerations for running successful grief groups, including: ongoing vs. time-limited groups; how ages should be grouped; how to group according to type of loss; and, what location and size is ideal.


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Chapter 15: Play Therapy to Help Bereaved Children
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Chapter 15: Play Therapy to Help Bereaved Children
This chapter by Nancy Boyd Webb explains how and when to use play therapy—an effective strategy for children to symbolically explore the meaning of their loss. She outlines how play therapy helps children who are too young to directly communicate their concerns and fears and concludes by offering several case studies in using play therapy with children.


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